Archive for November, 2013

300px-A_Sunday_on_La_Grande_Jatte,_Georges_Seurat,_1884
(Fleming, Arts & Ideas, 7th Edition 1986)

Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat shows how the impressionistic theory was carried to a logical, methodical, almost mathematical conclusion. Light, shadow, and color are still the major concerns, and the subject is also that of an urban scene, this time of a relaxed group of middle-class Parisians on a Sunday outing. Instead of informal casual arrangements, however, everything here seems as set as an old-fashioned family portrait. Instead of misty indistinct forms, such details as a bustle, a parasol, or a stovepipe hat are as stylized and geometrical as in a Renaissance fresco.

Unlike the impressionists, who improvised their pictures outdoors, Seurat carefully composed his large canvas in his studio over a period of years. Instead of hastily painted patches of broken color, Seurat worked out a system called Pointillism. By this system thousands of dots of uniform size were applied to the canvas in such a calculated and painstaking way that the most subtle tints were brought under his control. The picture, moreover, was divided into areas, and graduating shades blended tonalities into a tonal unity.

-Roz Barron Abellera

You call me a dog well that’s fair enough
’cause it aint no use to pretend
You’re wrong
When you call me out I can’t hide anymore
I have no disguise you cant see through

Well you say it’s bad luck
To have fallen for me
Well what can I say to make it good for you
You wore me out like an old winter coat
Trying to be safe from the cold

But when it’s my time to throw
The next stone
I’ll call you beautiful if I call at all
You call me a dog

You tell me I’m low cause I’ve slept on the floor
And out in the woods with the badgers & wolves
You threw me out ’cause I went digging for gold
And I came home with a handful of coal

But when it’s my time to throw the next stone
I’ll call you beautiful if I call at all
And when its my time to call your bluff
I’ll call you beautiful or leave it alone
You call me a dog
Well that’s fair enough
It doesn’t bother me as long as you know
Bad luck will follow you
If you keep me on a leash and
You drag me along

But when it’s my time to throw the next stone
I’ll call you beautiful if I call at all
And when its my time to call your bluff
I’ll call you beautiful or leave it alone
You call me a dog

-Roz Barron Abellera

300px-Pierre-Auguste_Renoir,_Le_Moulin_de_la_Galette

(Fleming, Arts & Ideas, 7th Edition 1986)

Bal du moulin de la Galette (commonly known as Dance at Le moulin de la Galette) is an 1876 painting by French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

Auguste Renoir, like Manet, was interested in casual, lighthearted scenes. Even before Manet painted his Bar at the Folies-Bergere, Renoir had done a similar scene set in a popular outdoor Paris café, Bal du moulin de la Galette, which had been shown first in the 1877 impressionist exhibit. The full force of impressionistic color is felt in the rainbow of brilliant hues, especially the variations of blue and the marvelous quality of filtered gaslight that Renoir had at his commend. His obvious intention was to evoke the atmosphere of carefree gaity and the whirling movement of dance as well as to revel in a world of color and light.

-Roz Barron Abellera