Archive for September, 2017

 

When the routine bites hard
And ambitions are low
And the resentment rides high
But emotions wont grow
And we’re changing our ways,
Taking different roads
Then love, love will tear us apart again

Why is the bedroom so cold
Turned away on your side?
Is my timing that flawed,
Our respect run so dry?
Yet there’s still this appeal
That weve kept through our lives
Love, love will tear us apart again

Do you cry out in your sleep
All my failings expose?
Get a taste in my mouth
As desperation takes hold
Is it something so good
Just cant function no more?
When love, love will tear us apart again

-Joy Division

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henrydavidthoreau1

This is some of the best advice I ever followed. Get rid of the anxiety of tomorrow. Tomorrow isn’t guaranteed so why worry about it. Yesterday is worth nothing- the past is gone. You have no control over it. It’s okay to reflect on past good times but not okay to live in the past. You have to progress and move on.

So all we really have control over is the present moment. Live in the present moment. Right here, right now. It just makes life simpler and easier to manage.

-Roz

 

 

Every breath you take
Every move you make
Every bond you break
Every step you take
I’ll be watching you
Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every night you stay
I’ll be watching you
Oh can’t you see
You belong to me
My poor heart aches
With every step you take
Every move you make
Every vow you break
Every smile you fake
Every claim you stake
I’ll be watching you
Since you’ve gone I been lost without a trace
I dream at night I can only see your face
I look around but it’s you I can’t replace
I feel so cold and I long for your embrace
I keep crying baby, baby, please
Oh can’t you see
You belong to me
My poor heart aches
With every step you take
Every move you make
Every vow you break
Every smile you fake
Every claim you stake
I’ll be watching you
Every move you make
Every step you take
I’ll be watching you
I’ll be watching you
(Every breath you take, every move you make, every bond you break, every step you take)
I’ll be watching you
(Every single day, every word you say, every game you play, every night you stay)
I’ll be watching you
(Every move you make, every vow you break, every smile you fake, every claim you stake)
I’ll be watching you
(Every single day, every word you say, every game you play, every night you stay)
I’ll be watching you
(Every breath you take, every move you make, every bond you break, every step you take)
I’ll be watching you
(Every single day, every word you say, every game you play, every night you stay)
I’ll be watching you
-The Police

I finally found a place where I want to make chubby babies, grow old and paint until I die. I’m at peace here.

-Roz

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No, this isn’t the title of the latest horror movie coming from Netflix. This is a lesson or exercise to get your brain trained to instinctively know where shadows fall when you’re drawing people or things from memory and you have no model for reference to look at.  As simple as it may seem, knowing where a shadow should be in your painting or drawing can sometimes be a difficult thing if you’re aiming for realism.

This exercise was taught to me by an older and wiser artist I once knew and it has been very valuable in my progression as an artist.

The first thing you do is you get a newspaper, it can be any old newspaper you have lying around, and look for a good picture of a person with shadows falling on the face or body.  Example 1 is a good picture of a man’s face with a shadow. See example 1 below:

Example 1

face1

In this example, you can see that the shadow falls on the right side of his face, or facing him and looking at him, it would be our left hand side.

Next, you take a pencil and just shade in over exactly where ever you see a shadow on his face.  It doesn’t have to be perfect but make sure to get the mental image of where the shadow falls.  You can even shade in the shadow that falls on his shirt. See example 2 below:

Example 2:

face 2

Once you are finished with this picture, you can look through the rest of the newspaper and find other faces and bodies or even objects to shade in over the shadows with your pencil.  You can repeat this exercise as many times as you like. Always take mental note of the shapes and where the shadows fall. The more you do it the better you will become in placing shadows in your drawings and paintings.

I know this may seem boring to an artist. “What’s the point?” you may ask. Well, what happens over time from doing this exercise is that you will instantly know, for example, when drawing a face out of memory, where the shadows would be without having to look at pictures to help you.

If you’ve ever played a sport or trained in martial arts, they would call this instinct  “muscle memory.”  For example, if you’re trained in boxing, when someone throws a right hand punch at you, you instinctively know how to step out of the way of the punch and counter with a punch of your own. But when you’re first learning how to box, you would break down the steps: “Okay when he punches, I move this way”….etc, etc. You’ll start slow and make many mistakes in the process. But from practicing the steps over and over again over time,  you get to the point where when someone throws a punch. BOOM. You react and counter without even thinking. In a split second you know what to do and your body already acted. This is muscle memory.

The same thing happens over time with drawing. After, breaking down the steps of where shadows fall on faces and objects, and practicing this over and over again, it can also become muscle memory and your brain and hands know exactly where to place your shadows in your drawings. So when you see or draw a face, your brain knows and shades in where the shadow would be without even thinking. Your hand just reacts in seconds.

Right now, I’m illustrating a graphic novel and most of the drawings are coming straight from my head without looking at any references for help. So this has helped me immensely in knowing where the shadows would be when I draw people.  Try this exercise and you will see your own skills improve.

-Roz