Archive for the ‘movie’ Category

Hey, Julia Bigelow. Do you remember this?

 

…always makes me hungry for fried calamari.

 

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Could You Be Loved?

Could you be loved and be loved?
Could you be loved and be loved?

Don’t let them fool you
Or even try to school you
We’ve got a mind of our own,
So go to hell if what you’re thinking is not right
Love would never leave us alone,
In the darkness there must come out the light.

Could you be loved and be loved?
Could you be loved and be loved?

(The road of life is rocky and you may stumble too,
So while you point your fingers someone else is judging you)
(Could you be, could you be, could you be loved?
Could you be, could you be loved?
Could you be, could you be, could you be loved?
Could you be, could you be loved?)

Don’t let them change you
Or even rearrange you
We’ve got a life to live.
They say: only, only,
Only the fittest of the fittest shall survive,
Stay alive

Could you be loved and be loved?
Could you be loved and be loved?

(You ain’t gonna miss your water until your well runs dry;
No matter how you treat him, the man will never be satisfied.)
(Could you be, could you be, could you be loved?
Could you be, could you be loved?)
(Could you be, could you be, could you be loved?)
Could you be, could you be loved?)

Say something.

–Bob Marley

 

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Pulp Fiction is a 1990’s Gangster movie by Quentin Tarantino. It is not only my favorite movie in the Gangster genre, but one of my favorite movies of all time out of any genre.  I consider it the best movie out of Tarantino’s body of work and I’ve watched it countless times.

In the film, the hitman Jules Winnfield, played by Samuel L. Jackson, recites a passage from the Bible right before he performs a hit. The passage he recites is Ezekial 25:17. These are some of the most intense scenes in movie history and Samuel L. Jackson’s spin on it is unforgettable.

I was asked  by an acquaintance to create something because he was a fan of the verse and this is what I came up with. It is in no way affiliated with Pulp Fiction, Quentin Tarantino or Miramax films but if you like the verse, here you go.

http://www.redbubble.com/people/rozabellera/works/11453779-ezekial-25-17?c=265238-art-with-type

–Roz Abellera

http://www.EyeOfRoz.com

 

Train In Vain

You say you stand by your man
Tell me something I don’t understand
You said you love me and that’s a fact
Then you left me, said you felt trapped

Well some things you can explain away
But my heartache’s in me till this day

Did you stand by me?
No, not at all
Did you stand by me?
No way

All the times
When we were close
I’ll remember these things the most
I see all my dreams come tumbling down
I won’t be happy without you around

So all alone I keep the wolves at bay
There is only one thing that I can say

Did you stand by me?
No, not at all
Did you stand by me?
No way

You must explain why this must be
Did you lie when you spoke to me

Did you stand by me?
No, not at all
Did you stand by me?
No way

Now I got a job
But it don’t pay
I need new clothes
I need somewhere to stay
But without all these things I can do
But without your love I won’t make it through

But you don’t understand my point of view
I suppose there’s nothing I can do

Did you stand by me?
No, not at all
Did you stand by me?
No way

You must explain why this must be
Did you lie when you spoke to me?

Did you stand by me?
No, not at all
Did you stand by me?
No way

–The Clash

 

Rain Song

It is the springtime of my loving – the second season I am to know
You are the sunlight in my growing – so little warmth I’ve felt before.
It isn’t hard to feel me glowing – I watched the fire that grew so low.

It is the summer of my smiles – flee from me Keepers of the Gloom.
Speak to me only with your eyes. It is to you I give this tune.
Ain’t so hard to recognize – These things are clear to all from time to time.

I’ve felt the coldness of my winter
I never thought it would ever go. I cursed the gloom that set upon us
But I know that I love you so. But I know that I love you so

These are the seasons of emotion and like the wind they rise and fall
This is the wonder of devotion – I see the torch we all must hold.
This is the mystery of the quotient, quotient – Upon us all, upon us all a little rain must fall.
It’s just a little rain

–Led Zeppelin

I watched you change
Into a fly
I looked away
You were on fire

I watched a change in you
It’s like you never had wings
Now, you feel so alive
I’ve watched you change

I took you home
Set you on the glass
I pulled off your wings
Then I laughed

I watched a change in you
It’s like you never had wings
Now, you feel so alive
I’ve watched you change

It’s like you never had wings

I look at the cross
Then I look away
Give you the gun
Blow me away

I watched a change in you
It’s like you never had wings
Now, you feel so alive
I’ve watched you change

It’s like you never had wings

**Videos and lyrics on this blog are the property of the rightful copyright owners and are used here for educational purposes only.

–Roz Abellera

Bob Ross was my late father’s favorite artist. Growing up, my father would switch on the Bob Ross show, ‘The Joy Of Painting,’  which came on Sundays on public TV. He’d say “Son, look at this guy paint, he’s good!” I would sit there amazed at how Bob Ross could paint mountains and nature scenes without a reference; it all just came out of his head through memory and techniques.

Bob Ross has videos and lessons that you can take to learn his painting techniques. Perhaps, when I have more time in my life, I’ll take some time and sit down and take one of his video lessons. But I’ve  watched his show so many times that I’m sure I’ve absorbed some things from him through osmosis.

Sadly, Bob Ross passed away from cancer in 1995 at the age of 52. Today, some people like to do parodies of him because let’s face it, he was quite a character. But this doesn’t take away from the fact that he was a genius painter in my eyes.

Every time I see a video of Bob Ross on YouTube or see a rerun on TV, it takes me back to those Sunday afternoons with my father. Bob Ross and ‘The Joy Of Painting’ will always have a special place in my heart.

–Roz Abellera

The_Scream

     The Scream also known as The Cry is the name given to each of four versions of a painting, created as both paintings and pastels, by the Expressionist Norwegian artist Edvard Munch between 1893 and 1910. It has been described as an icon of Modern Art and “the Mona Lisa of our time. It is an iconic and haunting painting, definitely one of the darkest paintings in art history. I could only imagine in the pre-television age of the 1890’s, it was probably more haunting and dark to the general public of that time. I know it left an impact on me the first time I saw it 100 years after its creation. Powerful.

This composition left such a mark on art and culture that it has been copied and parodied by different artists of different mediums for decades. The most recent influence I can think of was the Skull-face mask worn by the killer of the popular Scream series of horror movies. Many people don’t know that the look of the villain from the movie Scream came from the influence of this painting. The mask was created by Brigitte Sleiertin, a Fun World employee, as a Halloween costume, prior to being discovered by Wes Craven for the film.

What I learned from this painting is that art can be cathartic: you can express your deepest and inner emotions through art. Art doesn’t have to be roses and landscapes all the time. As an artist I like to be able to express myself, warts and all- the beautiful and the ugly. Thus is life.

I could only imagine what Munch was feeling at the time he painted this. There is a clue as to how Munch may have been feeling from a passage in his diary:

In his diary in an entry headed, Nice 22 January 1892, Munch described his inspiration for the image:

“One evening I was walking along a path, the city was on one side and the fjord below. I felt tired and ill. I stopped and looked out over the fjord—the sun was setting, and the clouds turning blood red. I sensed a scream passing through nature; it seemed to me that I heard the scream. I painted this picture, painted the clouds as actual blood. The color shrieked. This became The Scream.

100 years later The Scream still has an impact and I admire Edvard Munch for having the guts to present to the world his deepest and darkest emotions through this work.

–Roz Abellera